"Providing Clear, Concrete Visual Supports with Behavioral Development Strategies to Promote Independent Reasoning Skills"




 
 

Irene's Ideas are the Same for the Development of Both Behavioral
Responses, and Independent Behavioral Reasoning Skills

Green (2003) "Red and Green Choices"
 www.redandgreenchoices.com


 
"Throwing Materials When Finished with a Project"   "Student Wanting To Play with Other Children, But Acts Very Mean When They Are Playing"

First of all... great! You already know "when" the objects will be thrown. Now, how will you prevent this from occurring, and replace it with a different, desired behavioral response? This new behavior - keeping objects 'out of the air' - must be developed through positive and predictable strategies.

What I would do, is immediately remove the "object" from the child, until this responsible behavior is developed.





I must provide a safe environment for each student in my room. To ensure a "behavioral trust" relationship with each child I will "..remain in charge of safe situations..".

I would use intensive 1:1 strategies to replace this behavior with an appropriate and safe alternative, or tolerable solution.

Create Red and Green Meaning:
What exactly will happen when this is thrown? Draw it.
Use pairing to condition the red and green through your reactions; voice, tone, expressions.
To first change this long-standing maladaptive behavioral pattern, I would first take the materials - the first time this behavior occurs.
I would then, only allow the student to use such materials with 1:1 assistance,
I will continually remind him "no red throw" and "yes green hold" with a picture or chart. (or words for older students)
Then slowly, I will begin the student performing the appropriate green task/behavior for a few seconds at a time - with intensive 1:1 monitoring right with the child. This is to prevent the red choice behavior. As soon as an antecedent stimulus occurs, or if it even seems as if the red behavior will occur, I can/will intervene. (provide an immediate response)
I will also reinforce the green behavior while the student is choosing to display it - even for 2 seconds. (allow student success)
I will also remind the student when away from the situation, when calm, of his exact red and green choices, and ask him - green ____, or red ____.  I will make sure he understands by pointing to the chart, or drawing his own picture, or by telling me about it.

 

First of all... great! You already know "when" the child will be mean. Now, how will you prevent this from occurring, and replace it with a different, desired behavioral response? This new behavior - playing alongside or with others - must be developed through positive and predictable strategies.

What I would do, is immediately remove the "situation" from the child, until this responsible behavior is developed.

(Note: this may only entail 10 seconds for intervention strategies, while keeping it non-seclusionary, and only a short visible distance away from the situation, and as positive as possible.)

I must provide a safe environment for each student in my room. To ensure a "behavioral trust" relationship with each child I will "..remain in charge of safe situations..".

I would use intensive 1:1 strategies to replace this behavior with an appropriate and safe alternative, or tolerable solution.

Create Red and Green Meaning:
What exactly will happen when this is displayed? Draw it.
Use pairing to condition the red and green through your reactions; voice, tone, expressions.
To first change this long-standing maladaptive behavioral pattern, I would first take the "situation" - the first time this behavior occurs.
I would then, only allow the student to "be in the situation" with 1:1 assistance.
I will continually remind him "no red          " and "yes green      " with a picture or chart. (or words for older students)
Then slowly, I will begin the student performing the appropriate green task/behavior for a few seconds at a time - with intensive 1:1 monitoring right with the child. This is to prevent the red choice behavior. As soon as an antecedent stimulus occurs, or if it even seems as if the red behavior will occur, I can/will intervene. (provide an immediate response)
I will also reinforce the green behavior while the student is choosing to display it - even for 2 seconds. (allow student success)
I will also remind the student when away from situation, when calm, of his exact red and green choices, and ask him - green ____, or red ____.  I will make sure he understands by pointing to the chart, or drawing his own picture, or by telling me about it.

Shaping: Using Successive Approximations of the Appropriate Green Responses
Begin small by breaking down each behavior.
Use 2 exact and incompatible choices.
The "mean" behavior must be specifically described. Is it making a mean face at another, is it taking an object from another, not sharing, or hitting?
Set the highest behavioral expectations, but be sure they are achievable. Will the student be able to perform the simplified task, or only become frustrated. The student may need to display the behavior for only a few seconds at a time, while you develop a "behavioral trust" relationship with him, allowing student success and providing ample amounts of 'green' developmentally appropriate praise.

High Student Response Item or Favorite Activity:
After you begin conditioning red and through your reactions, "no red", your deep and stern voice tones, and your static facial expressions, and "yes green" through the opposite behaviors, then try introducing a desired and undesired consequence.
What does the the student prefer, like, go to first when it's their choice, or do for extended periods of time?
Tape or place a duplicate of his chart to or near the "high response student object or activity". When earned, this will remind him of why he is enjoying this.

Fading:
Eventually remove your verbal actions, and provide a "self-prompting" chart so the student may begin to make his own behavioral choices.
Put the chart/list in the project area.



Return to Specific Situations Page


The Material Presented from "Red and Green Choices", Is Based Upon Irene's Own Behavioral Intervention Strategies, and What Types of Behavioral
and Academic Assistance Has Promoted Positive Outcomes With Her and Her Students When Applying Red and Green Choices Behavioral Principles

 


Copyright 2009 Green Irene

 

Books, Materials & Posters Copyright 2003, 2004, 2005 Green Irene, Logo is a TM of Green Irene, Red and Green ChoicesTM:
"Printable" Charts/Lists May Be Copied, Downloaded or Printed - When Referencing or Paraphrasing or Quoting Irene's Works / Writings, Please Use Proper Citations CITATION HELP PAGE

 

 

 

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